About Me


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About Me: Fully Enjoying the Second Act of Life

I’m an educator, author, life coach, and community development consultant. I’m extremely grateful to be 70, content with all that I have and all that I am right now. Being confronted by end-stage liver disease just before my sixtieth birthday helped me learn lots of lessons, which I’m eager to share.

10,000 boomers are turning 65 each day. A majority of us want to leave our homes feet first, old and used up. But we face serious future shortages in the area of medical and long-term support services, to say nothing of transportation challenges, so in addition to enjoying life on the edge of the Pisgah Forest, I’m involved in several initiatives focused on culture change in aging. I hope you will explore my Services and Publications pages designed for people too young to worry about aging, yet mature enough to prepare.

Subscribe to my blog to keep up with useful tools, innovative practices, and inspirational people that can help us create our own age-friendly communities. Contact me directly.

Here’s a peek at the life and times of an aging enthusiast.

 

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I was born an infant with feet turned out like Charlie Chaplin. Two years wearing uncomfortable leg braces corrected that problem and I grew into a happy, healthy little dancer. See me standing in front of the old family Plymouth standing in first position?

Between age twelve and fourteen I fought off an inflammation of the liver the doctors referred to as “Hepatitis.” I became jaundiced, fatigued, nauseous, and had to be home-tutored. Medicine then was not what it is now, and no one ever really knew what had ruined my teenage years.

By the time I came of age I had been given a clean bill of health, so I went full steam ahead for many more decades, unaware that anything was wrong. Until the liver disease I thought had been conquered in childhood reached a critical mass and turned deadly serious in 2006.

I’m just an ordinary person, but mine is a story of miracles. I trust you’ll discover by reading the book I wrote about my liver journey through end stage liver disease that miracles are accessible to us all.